Category Archives: Tamron 150-600mm

Rainy days

When it rains the thought of going out and taking pictures might not be on the top of the list. Although I feel it is the perfect time to take pictures. Especially when you can sit indoors by the window and just click some pics of birds in the trees. That is the most convenient thing to do.

I was lucky to have a nice garden right outside my window on my vacation. So I would just wait for birds to come to me. Here are some pics I took with the combo of Canon 6D and Tamron 150-600 mm lens.

The above pictures are showing a Purple-rumped Sunbird from India. It just landed on some leaves right in front of the window. It was busy catching a white spider that was hiding between the leaves. When I took the picture I could not see what it was searching for but looking closely at the picture it cached a pretty good meal.

A simple picture of a crow gets more effect when the rain pours down. It is like you can almost feel the silence and sound of the raindrops touching the leaves of the tree.

So lets not be discourage just because it rains. Enjoy and be creative!

 

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Reflections – Bird pictures with Tamron150-600mm

I was walking in the park and I sat down at a bench to just enjoy the sunny weather and to have a bit of break. I turned around to check out the little lake that was behind me. There I saw a little bird that came very close to where I was sitting.

I took up my camera and aimed. I was using Canon 70D and the lens was a Tamron 150-600 mm version 1. I got the following pics of the bird called Wagtail.

As I continued sitting on the bench and relaxing there came other birds that wanted to drink the water. So I felt I was lucky that the birds were coming to my spot instead of me trying to come to theirs.

I call this segment reflections since all the birds have a reflection in the water.

This bird is called a Fieldfare

 

A pigeon also need some water

All of the pictures above are taken at 600 mm with a aperture of f8. The picture below is taken at 350 mm with a aperture of 7.1. The reson I mostly take at f8 is because in order to get pretty sharp pictures with Tamron 150-600 you need to be at this aperture.

 

Crow and its reflection

 

 

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Bird photography with Tamron 150-600mm

The most fun with bird photography is the challenge to get a photo of a very active bird. Small birds in particular have a hard time of staying in the same place for more than just few seconds. These pictures are taken with Canon 70D and Tamron 150-600mm. I like this lens a lot. Tamron 150-600 mm lens is cheap compare to the professional and expensive 600 mm lenses but still delivers some great shots. I will share some pictures I have taken with Tamron 150-600mm lens.

Reed Bunting (male)

Kestrel (male) searching for a bite to eat

Swallows waiting to be fed

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Sandpiper in sunset

Sandpiper looking for food

Sandpiper looking for food

Pictures taken when it is sunset makes great pictures. The light is just right that that time. The sandpiper gets natural light on the front and the colors of the grass glows. This picture is taken in south of Sweden. This bird might look big but its very small. Luckily I had my Tamron 150-600 mm with me so that I could zoom in on the bird. It was taken from the car and through a fence.

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Eurasian Curlew with Tamron 150-600mm

Do I have something on my beak?

Eurasian Curlew

Eurasian Curlew

On a sunny day I took this picture of a Eurasian Curlew. Its a mid sized bird that looks very interesting with the long beak. It is taken at 600 mm with Tamron 150-600mm lens and with Canon 70D. Even if this picture is taken at the maximum length of 600 mm it still turned out sharp. Tamron perform great when it is sunny weather. All the details will be seen and it nicely blurred out the background. The aperture is at f7.1 in this picture.

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I want food!

Black-headed Gulls

Begging for food

Begging for food

I took this picture when I was near a pond in a park. These birds looked very funny, like they were having a conversation so I quickly took a picture of them. I think the little black-headed gull is saying to the other that it wants food.

I used Tamron 150-600 mm with Canon 6D. The 6D really make the picture look softer and I like the result. Have you ever tried this lens and camera combination? Which combination do you prefer?

To see more pictures of this combo click here or follow me on facebook by clicking here.

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Damn, I lost it!

Damn, I lost it!

Damn, I lost it!

Talk about having something at the tip of your tongue. A fun picture of a nuthatch eating seeds, it was not easy for it to get a seed. The nuthatch kept dropping the seeds and had to try again to pick one up. The picture is taken with a Canon 6D and Tamron 150-600mm.

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Canon 70D vs 6D using Tamron 150-600mm

Quantity or quality, what do you want?

I recently got the Canon 6D and there is a great difference in quality when you are using Tamron 150-600mm. You can for example go down to 6.3 when you are using 600mm without any problems. On 70D the ISO would shot up very high if you were at 600 mm and you would get a lot of pixels showing when you were looking at the picture in your computer.

With Canon 6D you get better picture quality, since it is a full format camera house you can easier crop the picture in post production to only focus on the parts you like to keep. If you would crop a picture taken with Canon 70D that would effect the picture quality and make some parts blurry.

Canon 6D is not made to take pictures of birds flying by, that is much better with 70D since the picture per second is 7 and only 4,5 with 6D.

Duck sleeping peacefully

Duck sleeping peacefully

This picture is taken with Canon 6D and Tamron 150-600mm. It was little dark but 6D managed to take a great picture anyway. This picture is only taken at 250mm so there is a great sharpness in the picture. The ISO is at 1000 but there is no pixels visible compared if I would take this picture with 70D.

The softness that you get in the background with 6D is always a plus. I am now considering always using my Canon 6D for wildlife, but it is good to have 70D if you are expecting to take picture of flying birds or bigger animals like a tiger or leopard on a wildlife safari trip. I recommend to have both camera houses in your camera bag if you have the possibility.

Nuthatch hanging on

Nuthatch hanging on

This picture is also taken with Canon 6D, this is taken at 600mm but there are still nice sharpness and the background is blurred out to make the picture even better. The aperture is at f7.1. If I would take a picture with Canon 70D I would use f9 to f11 in aperture to get a sharper image. The amount of pictures that turns out great are more with Canon 6D then 70D.

If you have any question feel free to ask in the comments field below.

 

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Is it possible to take photos of insects with a telephoto lens?

Tamron 150-600mm lens delivers quality close-up photos of insects

I was out shooting some pictures of birds with the Tamron 150-600mm and then suddenly I saw a dragonfly on a leaf. I quickly zoomed in on it and took a picture. The result is showed below.

Red dragonfly (Oriental Scarlet Crocothemis servilia), its a male. Male is totally red colored and female is olivaceous brown in color. It lives everywhere near stagnant water reservoirs such as tanks, ponds and paddy fields. This shot is taken with my big lens, but I got it to look like macro photography. Its taken in India.

Red dragonfly (Oriental Scarlet Crocothemis servilia), its a male. Male is totally red colored and female is olivaceous brown in color. It lives everywhere near stagnant water reservoirs such as tanks, ponds and paddy fields. This shot is taken with my big lens, but I got it to look like macro photography. It’s taken in India.

 

Now who says you can’t take a good macro picture with a big lens? I just proved it is possible. Here is one more proof:

Green dragonfly

Green dragonfly

 

I also took a picture of a butterfly. I think the result turn out pretty good. I have not done anything to the picture just added my logo.

Butterfly taken with Tamron 150-600mm

Grey Pansy Butterfly taken with Tamron 150-600mm

I am not saying that you should replace your macro lenses with a telephoto lens. I am just glad you can take different photo styles with one lens.

 

 

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Crested Hawk Eagle – Tamron 150-600mm

Close up of a crested Hawk Eagle from India

The pictures below is Taken with a Canon 70D and Tamron 150-600mm. I took this picture in south of India. The Crested Hawk Eagle blend in with the environment so they can sometimes be hard to see. I was lucky enough to see this kind of bird twice.

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