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Slooooow shutter speed

Some people work in a office all day, some people work with sparks

Catching the sparks from the fire is easy. You just slow down the shutter speed and you will have long sparks coming out from the fire, instead of small dots. Check the below pictures to see the difference between fast and slow shutter speed.

Shutter speed is at 1/100 of a second and the sparks looks like dots

Fast shutter speed: Shutter speed is at 1/100 of a second and the sparks looks like dots


Shutter speed at 1/13 makes the sparks longer

Slow shutter speed: Shutter speed at 1/13 makes the sparks longer


In these pictures I am using a shutter speed of 1/10 to 1/13 of a second.

I have croped out a little part of a big picture to only focus on the worker. So the sharpness might not be so good since he was pretty far away when I took these pictures. If you are wondering what he is doing then he is removing s steel pole. These pictures are taken with Canon 6D (full frame) and 24-105mm lens at f4 and f5 with ISO100 to ISO160.

When is it usefull with slow shutter speed?

  • when you want to create cool light messages. You can write words with a flashlight and using slow shutter speed to create bright letters
  • when taking pictures of fireworks
  • if its pretty dark out and you want the picture to capture more light then slow shutter speed is a option, dont forget to use a tripod
  • when taking pictures of cars head ligths or tail lights on a road, you might have seen the night pictures of red or yellow lights that are like lines on the roads. That can be made from very slow shutter speed

To control the shutter speed you can use the option called TV (Shutter Priority Mode) on Canon and S on Nikon.


2016©Expressive Photos

Would you like to have a 500 mm lens?

If you are into bird photography then the ideal lenses for that are the  500mm,  600mm and even the 800mm lens. They are my dream lenses. Why? Well because they take really clear and amazing pictures, at least for what I have seen by people using the lenses.


Photo courtesy to

So what is stopping most people from getting one in their collection? Well its simple, it cost a lot. Depending on where you are from in the world the price can vary a lot which seems little unfair if you stay in a very expensive country. Usually Singapore or  US will sell them cheaper then here where I am staying.

I like to keep a goal which could be reachable but it should not be to easy to reach it, you have to earn it. When you have the lens you always wanted you will feel like, ok now what? So I am aiming for a big lens so that I can drool little longer over these dream lenses. With all the new versions coming out for teh same lens the older versions are getting cheaper and have a more reasonable price. So just wait and have patience and it will be yours one day. At least that is what I will keep telling myself, one they it will be mine.


What is your dream lens?

Sandpiper in sunset

Sandpiper looking for food

Sandpiper looking for food

Pictures taken when it is sunset makes great pictures. The light is just right that that time. The sandpiper gets natural light on the front and the colors of the grass glows. This picture is taken in south of Sweden. This bird might look big but its very small. Luckily I had my Tamron 150-600 mm with me so that I could zoom in on the bird. It was taken from the car and through a fence.

2015©Expressive Photos

Canon 70D vs 6D using Tamron 150-600mm

Quantity or quality, what do you want?

I recently got the Canon 6D and there is a great difference in quality when you are using Tamron 150-600mm. You can for example go down to 6.3 when you are using 600mm without any problems. On 70D the ISO would shot up very high if you were at 600 mm and you would get a lot of pixels showing when you were looking at the picture in your computer.

With Canon 6D you get better picture quality, since it is a full format camera house you can easier crop the picture in post production to only focus on the parts you like to keep. If you would crop a picture taken with Canon 70D that would effect the picture quality and make some parts blurry.

Canon 6D is not made to take pictures of birds flying by, that is much better with 70D since the picture per second is 7 and only 4,5 with 6D.

Duck sleeping peacefully

Duck sleeping peacefully

This picture is taken with Canon 6D and Tamron 150-600mm. It was little dark but 6D managed to take a great picture anyway. This picture is only taken at 250mm so there is a great sharpness in the picture. The ISO is at 1000 but there is no pixels visible compared if I would take this picture with 70D.

The softness that you get in the background with 6D is always a plus. I am now considering always using my Canon 6D for wildlife, but it is good to have 70D if you are expecting to take picture of flying birds or bigger animals like a tiger or leopard on a wildlife safari trip. I recommend to have both camera houses in your camera bag if you have the possibility.

Nuthatch hanging on

Nuthatch hanging on

This picture is also taken with Canon 6D, this is taken at 600mm but there are still nice sharpness and the background is blurred out to make the picture even better. The aperture is at f7.1. If I would take a picture with Canon 70D I would use f9 to f11 in aperture to get a sharper image. The amount of pictures that turns out great are more with Canon 6D then 70D.

If you have any question feel free to ask in the comments field below.


2015©Expressive Photos

Is it possible to take photos of insects with a telephoto lens?

Tamron 150-600mm lens delivers quality close-up photos of insects

I was out shooting some pictures of birds with the Tamron 150-600mm and then suddenly I saw a dragonfly on a leaf. I quickly zoomed in on it and took a picture. The result is showed below.

Red dragonfly (Oriental Scarlet Crocothemis servilia), its a male. Male is totally red colored and female is olivaceous brown in color. It lives everywhere near stagnant water reservoirs such as tanks, ponds and paddy fields. This shot is taken with my big lens, but I got it to look like macro photography. Its taken in India.

Red dragonfly (Oriental Scarlet Crocothemis servilia), its a male. Male is totally red colored and female is olivaceous brown in color. It lives everywhere near stagnant water reservoirs such as tanks, ponds and paddy fields. This shot is taken with my big lens, but I got it to look like macro photography. It’s taken in India.


Now who says you can’t take a good macro picture with a big lens? I just proved it is possible. Here is one more proof:

Green dragonfly

Green dragonfly


I also took a picture of a butterfly. I think the result turn out pretty good. I have not done anything to the picture just added my logo.

Butterfly taken with Tamron 150-600mm

Grey Pansy Butterfly taken with Tamron 150-600mm

I am not saying that you should replace your macro lenses with a telephoto lens. I am just glad you can take different photo styles with one lens.



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Tufted grey Langur – Tamron 150-600mm

Today’s picture is of a Langur from south of India. The picture is taken from a bus far away from the object. Used Canon 70D with a Tamron 150-600mm lens.

2015©Expressive Photos

Red-whiskered Bulbul and Tamron 150-600mm

Time to fly

The picture is taken in India. The little Red-whiskered Bulbul were about to fly but I managed to take this picture just before it took of. The Tamron 150-600mm lens was used with Canon 70D and it makes a great combination if you ask me. Tamron makes a nice smooth background.

2015©Expressive Photos

Crested Hawk-Eagle – taken with Tamron 150-600mm

 I went to India for my holiday. The picture is taken from the car and the bird were barely visible from where we were. The bird is called Crested Hawk-Eagle. I used a Canon 70D and Tamron 150-600mm to capture this picture. The bird has a unique look.

2015©Expressive Photos

Tamron 150-600mm – Wolf

Taken with Canon 70D and Tamron 150-600mm

Taken with Canon 70D and Tamron 150-600mm


2014©Expressive Photos

With a little help of Lightroom

Frustrated with your pictures being colorless?

Picture this scenario. You are seeing something that you want to take a picture of and when you take the picture and see the results in your camera or computer it does not come out quite the way you wanted it to.

Then there is a solution for that. It is called post-production. It is what all professional photographers do to their pictures, to make it look even better. So you do not have to feel ashamed for using a little help from example a program called Lightroom. I want to show you a before and after pictures to demonstrate what I mean. See the examples below, you need to click on the pictures to get a better comparison:

Before and after post production

Before and after post production

The picture to the left was taken with the “shade” option, therefore it is more yellowish. In Lightroom you can easily adjust this to make it look more natural. It is more colorful on the picture to the right. The picture below shows a dark picture inside the forest. It is hard to get the right brightness when you take a picture. It is easy to fix in post-production.

Before and after using Lightroom

Here is a final one that I like to share with you all. When you load a picture in the camera and watch it in the computer it can be colorless. With Lightroom you can bring out the bright colors and give the picture life again. There are many programs that can do this for your pictures for example Photoshop, Gimp (free program) and Topaz just to name a few.


I hope you have got some inspiration to work on your pictures now, it is worth it!

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2014©Expressive photos