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Slooooow shutter speed

Some people work in a office all day, some people work with sparks

Catching the sparks from the fire is easy. You just slow down the shutter speed and you will have long sparks coming out from the fire, instead of small dots. Check the below pictures to see the difference between fast and slow shutter speed.

Shutter speed is at 1/100 of a second and the sparks looks like dots

Fast shutter speed: Shutter speed is at 1/100 of a second and the sparks looks like dots


Shutter speed at 1/13 makes the sparks longer

Slow shutter speed: Shutter speed at 1/13 makes the sparks longer


In these pictures I am using a shutter speed of 1/10 to 1/13 of a second.

I have croped out a little part of a big picture to only focus on the worker. So the sharpness might not be so good since he was pretty far away when I took these pictures. If you are wondering what he is doing then he is removing s steel pole. These pictures are taken with Canon 6D (full frame) and 24-105mm lens at f4 and f5 with ISO100 to ISO160.

When is it usefull with slow shutter speed?

  • when you want to create cool light messages. You can write words with a flashlight and using slow shutter speed to create bright letters
  • when taking pictures of fireworks
  • if its pretty dark out and you want the picture to capture more light then slow shutter speed is a option, dont forget to use a tripod
  • when taking pictures of cars head ligths or tail lights on a road, you might have seen the night pictures of red or yellow lights that are like lines on the roads. That can be made from very slow shutter speed

To control the shutter speed you can use the option called TV (Shutter Priority Mode) on Canon and S on Nikon.


2016©Expressive Photos

Canon 70D vs 6D using Tamron 150-600mm

Quantity or quality, what do you want?

I recently got the Canon 6D and there is a great difference in quality when you are using Tamron 150-600mm. You can for example go down to 6.3 when you are using 600mm without any problems. On 70D the ISO would shot up very high if you were at 600 mm and you would get a lot of pixels showing when you were looking at the picture in your computer.

With Canon 6D you get better picture quality, since it is a full format camera house you can easier crop the picture in post production to only focus on the parts you like to keep. If you would crop a picture taken with Canon 70D that would effect the picture quality and make some parts blurry.

Canon 6D is not made to take pictures of birds flying by, that is much better with 70D since the picture per second is 7 and only 4,5 with 6D.

Duck sleeping peacefully

Duck sleeping peacefully

This picture is taken with Canon 6D and Tamron 150-600mm. It was little dark but 6D managed to take a great picture anyway. This picture is only taken at 250mm so there is a great sharpness in the picture. The ISO is at 1000 but there is no pixels visible compared if I would take this picture with 70D.

The softness that you get in the background with 6D is always a plus. I am now considering always using my Canon 6D for wildlife, but it is good to have 70D if you are expecting to take picture of flying birds or bigger animals like a tiger or leopard on a wildlife safari trip. I recommend to have both camera houses in your camera bag if you have the possibility.

Nuthatch hanging on

Nuthatch hanging on

This picture is also taken with Canon 6D, this is taken at 600mm but there are still nice sharpness and the background is blurred out to make the picture even better. The aperture is at f7.1. If I would take a picture with Canon 70D I would use f9 to f11 in aperture to get a sharper image. The amount of pictures that turns out great are more with Canon 6D then 70D.

If you have any question feel free to ask in the comments field below.


2015©Expressive Photos